A lovely day

Mark and I went to a lovely party at Janice and Marko’s yesterday, the have a beautiful house and an amazing collection.   We had a wonderful time!

Before going to the party, we did some cemetery browsing.   We went through Woodlawn   and Evergreen Cemeteries, they were beautiful.

Today I’ll show you the doors to some of the mausoleums, tomorrow I’ll show you some statues.

Life after people

A few days ago I watched a little of the History Channel’s “Life After People”.   I am often put off by all the drama inserted into a small bit of information on these shows, and this one was no different.   A deep voice kept telling me how quickly nature would invade a house, or an entire city if people were removed from the equation.   Duh.   I’ve been cleaning a house that was empty for probably six months, mold, raccoons, and mushrooms were moving in.   Every time I wash a wall over there several spiders come out with quizzical looks on their faces, asking what I’m doing.   Mark and I spend a lot of time evicting nature.   Squirrels are very interested in moving into our properties now that winter is placing its icy fingers on the land.   Every homeowner knows this.   What bothered me most about the program is that they had to travel all the way to the Chernobyl area to see what happens when humanity leaves.   These producers obviously live in a vibrant city, all they had to do was travel to Detroit.   It looks very much like the villages surrounding Chernobyl.   Photographers like Lynn’s brother Ralph have documented some of the return of nature in places like Tiger Stadium.   Most any walk in Detroit shows how quickly plants take over cement, Tiger Stadium and the train station are laboratory examples of this phenomenon.   Anyone who has looked at foreclosed houses that stand vacant knows keeping nature at bay is a constant battle, it’s hardly news, just every day maintenance.   I turned off the TV, Mark seems to think it’s stupid when I yell at it.

Where I stood..

Yesterday evening Mark and I took a walk. I’m trying to get Mark to walk more and work less, it’s what his back needs right now. There’s still a lot of pain, we’ll have to see what happens.

Our first stop is the Holbrook House (the first Wilcox House, before the big one downtown Plymouth), where unfortunately nothing is happening to preserve the grand building.

Then we watched the sun set on Wilcox Lake.

The swans lined up on the lake, hoping we had some bread in our pockets. Sorry, swans, you’re on your own.

Then we gazed at the cloudy full moon above our neighborhood tavern. Nice evening.

Where I Stand Sunday is an ongoing photo essay examining the different places Lynn Krawczyk spends her life standing. Too often we take for granted the everyday places we spend our lives walking on. If you’d like to join her by posting a photo on Sunday of places you’ve been on your blog/photo hosting site/website, leave a comment on her Sunday posts telling her where she can find you/your photo and she’ll add a link to her sidebar so others can find you. I am one of those that Lynn has badgered into joining her, I have changed it to “where I stood”, because right now I’m sitting in front of the computer, not standing anywhere.

Why cars were really invented…

Not for transportation, but to display great hood ornaments!

Mark and I went to the Orphan Car Show in Ypsilanti yesterday, these are a few of the hood ornaments we saw. “Orphan” refers to brands of cars that no longer exist. Cars used to be unique, you could easily tell one brand from another, they all had different feelings and reputations. Now cars are very much alike and they change very little year to year. A day like yesterday makes me realize how boring cars are today.

Where I stood..

In front of flowers I should be planting today. Instead I’m going out to Ypsilanti to look at antique cars!

Where I Stand Sunday is an ongoing photo essay examining the different places Lynn Krawczyk spends her life standing. Too often we take for granted the everyday places we spend our lives walking on. If you’d like to join her by posting a photo on Sunday of places you’ve been on your blog/photo hosting site/website, leave a comment on her Sunday posts telling her where she can find you/your photo and she’ll add a link to her sidebar so others can find you. I am one of those that Lynn has badgered into joining her, I have changed it to “where I stood”, because right now I’m sitting in front of the computer, not standing anywhere.

Remembering Daisy

The Daisy Air Rifle building in Plymouth was torn down to build new condominiums. I find it ironic that, like many others, they’ve named the complex (Daisy Square) after what they’ve torn down. One wall, a beautiful facade of the building, was saved to be incorporated into the condo complex. The builder was allowed to demolish because he agreed to save the facade. Now he claims the facade is too deteriorated to save, and wants to demolish it. I am aghast that this might be allowed. If the wall has deteriorated, it’s due to the negligence of the builder, Joseph Freed and Associates. Freed promised to keep the facade, and he should be held to his promise. There are two things you can do. One is sign a petition asking the City Commission to hold Freed to his promise, see me, I have a petition. The other is to show up at the hearing on June 11 in City Hall at 7:00 and let your voice be heard. We’ve lost so many buildings in Plymouth, most recently the Masonic Temple. The Wilcox house is falling into disrepair, the Guenther house’s fate is uncertain, let’s try to keep what we have. These structures are what make Plymouth unique, soon our town will look like every other suburban town with the same streetscapes, town clocks, condos and chain restaurants. We do have people working to keep Plymouth historic, you can find out about them here.