Life or Death

First, a report on Mark’s back. So far, so good. He is getting stronger and doing a lot of walking. He still has a lot of soreness and some pain, I suspect a lot of that is from the surgery and we’ll have to wait and see as he heals. We do know that the surgery certainly helped, we just don’t know how much yet. Thanks for asking, Missy.

Second, I had to share the picture Christopher made for me while I was up north. I told him I tend to like creepy things, so he drew this for me.

And then there was this cemetery….

Yeah, there’s always a cemetery, and Leann always visits it. This is the Bohemian Cemetery on Mission peninsula up north. I love this place.

First, another view of the storm to set your mood:

Then, the stones:

Actually, this one isn’t a stone, it’s metal.

Trees are popular up north.

I like the marks someone put on this stone, I don’t know what they mean.

The woman gets no name, just mother.

Kroupas are big in the area, and this is the prettiest stone.   Lots of Annas in this cemetery.

Another tree stump.

A little wooden cross next to one of the stones.

I’m going to try not to turn this into a cemetery blog, wish me luck.

Christopher’s art

Whenever I go up north Christopher watercolors with me. Today I’m showing you some of his work.

Chris, working diligently.

One of his postcard watercolors.

Chris likes old cars.

This is what he used for a model, I guess he felt the frog driving it was a little too unrealistic.

The boy is from cherry country.

Art and surgery

First of all, Mark came out of his surgery great, they even let him come home last night, so now he’s on the mend. We won’t know how successful it was for a while, but all indications are it was at least a great help.

Sunday I talked a little about our trip up north. I taught Todd and Deb’s almost ten year old son Christopher how to embroider, and he took to it like a duck to water, so to say. In fact, he was so good at it that Deb had him embroider a duck on a receiving blanket for a shower present. She needed it in a couple of days and he got it done, I was amazed!

Here’s Chris working away.

And here he is showing off the finished project!

Meanwhile Mark kept Ben busy, or Ben kept Mark busy.

We had good weather, but they didn’t across the bay.

Where I stood..

Up north, with our friends. We had a great time, here I am with Ben, then with Chris’ feet. I’ll write more about it later, for Mark goes into surgery tomorrow, and I’m a little frazzled.

Where I Stand Sunday is an ongoing photo essay examining the different places Lynn Krawczyk spends her life standing. Too often we take for granted the everyday places we spend our lives walking on. If you’d like to join her by posting a photo on Sunday of places you’ve been on your blog/photo hosting site/website, leave a comment on her Sunday posts telling her where she can find you/your photo and she’ll add a link to her sidebar so others can find you. I am one of those that Lynn has badgered into joining her, I have changed it to “where I stood”, because right now I’m sitting in front of the computer, not standing anywhere.

More bugs

The common grasshopper that you and I know from childhood can become the biblical menace. When they get together, they develop a mob mentality, change their coloring, and become a plague.

A European beetle that eats the pistils, stamens, and petals of flowers. Beautifully iridescent, they can get as large as four inches.

Family get together

Mark’s brother Scott and his wife and daughter are in town, we had a bar-b-que at Mark’s folks last night. This is me and Leslie goofing.

The ever pensive Scott, trying to figure it out.

Leslie with Mark’s sister Kelly.

Kelly’s dog scooter.

Scott and Leslie’s daughter Kelsey. Imagine going through life looking like that!

Amy and Francine.

My man Mark, who is slated for back surgery on Monday! Smiling, or just gritting his teeth?

Leann Meixner: Nature Photographer

In case you didn’t get the joke, that’s a hysterically funny title. Those are two things I know nothing about, nature and photography. None the less, due to an automatic camera and patient wildlife, I managed to take these pictures on my walk yesterday. See, it’s not all fun and tombstones.

Plain dragonfly.

Fancy dragonfly.

And then there’s this guy. Er, girl? Probably girl, no antlers, and no spots, so she’s not a fawn. Yes, I found her in Eddy Hines park, I saw a mama and her baby the other day. I’ve been walking the same route for a year and a half, and these are the first deer I’ve seen.

Where I stood..


At Riverside Cemetery, checking out the stones.

I wasn”t the only one visiting the stones, so were the moles. They left squishy ground behind, and visited the dead a lttle closer than I care to.

Riverside is a huge, old cemetery. I always forget how vast it is and how many dead we have in Plymouth. It reminds me even more than our historic buildings, how old our town is.

There are some beautiful monuments.

Cemeteries are beautiful places to wander. Sometimes, they even offer a little humor.

I’ve heard that disc golf started in cemeteries, people trying to hit certain stones with their frisbees. I wonder if it started here.

This person’s name was Bolt. I hope someone bolted down their stone.

“throw me a line, I’m sinking!”

Where I Stand Sunday is an ongoing photo essay examining the different places Lynn Krawczyk spends her life standing. Too often we take for granted the everyday places we spend our lives walking on. If you’d like to join her by posting a photo on Sunday of places you’ve been on your blog/photo hosting site/website, leave a comment on her Sunday posts telling her where she can find you/your photo and she’ll add a link to her sidebar so others can find you. I am one of those that Lynn has badgered into joining her, I have changed it to “where I stood”, because right now I’m sitting in front of the computer, not standing anywhere.

Strange creatures

The Coelacanth fish is considered a living fossil, a primitive fish that was thought to be extinct. It was only known through fossils until 1938 when a living coelacanth was discovered. It grows to about five feet long and reaches 100 to 140 pounds. Big, ugly fish. Despite that, the fish’s image has been used to grace the Comorian 5 frac coin. Probably looks better than most politicians.

The mud-diver is a European toad, also known as the parsley frog. I don’t know why he’s known as the parsley frog. Mud-diver makes sense. Maybe he tastes good with parsley. Doesn’t look like it. Anyway, he is known for his long toes and internal vocal sac (that means when he croaks he doesn’t look like he’s blowing bubble gum bubbles, like other toads). Mud-divers tend to stay close to water, and their skin secretes gunk that isn’t so much poisonous as irritating. Don’t touch him. He only grows 3 to 5 inches.

There, you probably learned something new today. Exciting, huh?